LoginLOGIN
ResourcesRESOURCES

SCI HomeSCI HOME

Aoudad or Barbary Sheep - Africa | Online Record Book Preview


This is a preview of the Aoudad or Barbary Sheep - Africa species only.
Once you subscribe you will be able to view all the entry details for hundreds of different species, including full score sheets and photos.

This species has several classifications, to view each one you can click on the links below to jump down to that section:


Aoudad or Barbary Sheep - Africa

Aoudad or Barbary Sheep

Ammotragus lervia

Arrui (Sp), Mähnenschaf (G), Mouflon à manchettes (F). Also called arui (Arabic). "Aoudad" seems to be an anglicization of its Tunisian name udad, and is a better name than Barbary sheep, because this animal is not really a sheep, and is found in many parts of northern Africa besides the former Barbary States or Barbary coastal region. The name "Barbary" originates from the Berber people, the chief inhabitants of the region.

DESCRIPTION Shoulder height 36-40 inches (91-102 cm). Weight 200-250 pounds (90-115 kg).

The aoudad is a medium-sized mountain animal that is biologically intermediate between a goat and a sheep. It is strongly built, with a short mane on neck and shoulders and long flowing hair on throat, chest, forelegs and tail. The general color is sandy brown, with underparts paler. As in goats, the aoudad has a scent gland beneath the tail, but does not have glands between the hoofs, in the groin area or in front of the eyes. Its chromosome number is 58, which is the same as in the urials, but is different from the 60 that is universal in true goats. Aoudads will hybridize with domestic goats, but not with sheep. The horns (both sexes) are sheep-like, being smooth, thick, triangular in section, and curved to form a semi-circle over the neck (supracervical horns). Females are much smaller than males and lighter in color, with less hair and much smaller horns.

BEHAVIOR Usually lives in small family groups with an adult male. Old males and pregnant females may be solitary. Breeds mainly from September to November, but there is some activity throughout the year. A single young (often two) is born 5-1/2 months later. Newborns are able to get about in moderately rugged terrain almost at once, and are sexually mature at about 18 months. Females have been known to give birth twice in one year. Captives have lived as long as 20 years.

Feeds early morning and late afternoon, resting in shade at midday. Eats grasses and foliage, sometimes standing on its hind legs to browse. Drinks water where available, otherwise obtains moisture from its food. Will descend from rocky terrain in evening to feed on plains. Eyesight and hearing are very good, sense of smell is good. Alert and wary. An agile climber and jumper.

HABITAT Rocky mountains and desert hills.

DISTRIBUTION Desert hills and mountains of northern Africa from Morocco and Mauritania eastward to Libya and Chad. Also in northeastern Sudan. Believed extinct in Egypt.

Has been introduced on private ranches in South Africa, which is far outside its natural range, and also in Spain, Mexico and the United States.

REMARKS The aoudad is a superb game animal that is difficult to hunt under almost any circumstances.

TAXONOMIC NOTES Five extant subspecies are listed: angusi (Niger), blainei (Libya, Sudan), fasini (Libya, southern Tunisia), lervia (Morocco, northern Algeria, northern Tunisia), and sahariensis (western Sahara, Mauritania, Mali, southern Algeria, southern Libya, Chad). Their limits are unclear and we do not separate them. A sixth subspecies, ornatus, formerly occurred in Egypt, but is believed extinct.

STATUS The aoudad may never have been common in northern Africa because of its limited habitat in the desert environment. In recent years, its numbers have been reduced in many places from overhunting by local people, to whom it represents an important source of meat, skins and other parts; however, it is believed to still occur in much of its original range. To the best of our knowledge, Chad and Sudan are the places it can be hunted today in its natural range.





Classifications


Aoudad or Barbary Sheep - Species Detail

Scientific Name: Ammotragus lervia Gold: 115 4/8" Gold (Bow): 114"
AKA: Barbary Sheep Silver: 101" Silver (Bow): 0"
Endangered: Bronze: 90" Bronze (Bow): 81"

This online application provides access to the entire SCI Record Book. From here you are able to browse and search for entries by location, species, hunting company/guide, and more. This is a subscription service and you can sign up today by clicking the Subscribe Now button below. If you would like to view more information about this site, please click here

New to the Online Record Book? Click the button below to sign up today!


Previous Records 1-36 of 36 Next
Member Taken Location Hunting Company/Guide Measurer MOK Score OR MR

The Aoudad or Barbary Sheep currently has 36 Entries listed in the SCI Record Book!

Once you subscribe you'll be able to access photos and full socre sheets for all of these entries. Plus you can filter, sort, and search through all species and entries in the SCI database. If you would like to subscribe now to have access to the entire database, please click here.



Return to Top





Aoudad or Barbary Sheep (South Africa) - Species Detail

Scientific Name: Ammotragus lervia Gold: 126" Gold (Bow): 112 3/8"
AKA: Barbary Sheep Silver: 117 4/8" Silver (Bow): 0"
Endangered: Bronze: 98" Bronze (Bow): 90"

This online application provides access to the entire SCI Record Book. From here you are able to browse and search for entries by location, species, hunting company/guide, and more. This is a subscription service and you can sign up today by clicking the Subscribe Now button below. If you would like to view more information about this site, please click here

New to the Online Record Book? Click the button below to sign up today!


Previous Records 1-95 of 95 Next
Member Taken Location Hunting Company/Guide Measurer MOK Score OR MR

The Aoudad or Barbary Sheep (South Africa) currently has 95 Entries listed in the SCI Record Book!

Once you subscribe you'll be able to access photos and full socre sheets for all of these entries. Plus you can filter, sort, and search through all species and entries in the SCI database. If you would like to subscribe now to have access to the entire database, please click here.



Return to Top







©2007-2017 Safari Club International    Site Map    Privacy Policy
4800 West Gates Pass Road
Tucson, Arizona
PH: (520) 620-1220
Powered By: Simpleview